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Grace 17 Melbourne • I like science
fromquarkstoquasars:

What is the Difference Between Brown Dwarfs, Gas Giants, and Stars?
Brown dwarfs can have planets, but gas giants can only have moons. Yet, both are essentially just massive spheres of gas. So what separates one from the other? Find out at:http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/what-is-the-difference-between-brown-dwarfs-gas-giants-and-stars/
Image via NASA

fromquarkstoquasars:

What is the Difference Between Brown Dwarfs, Gas Giants, and Stars?

Brown dwarfs can have planets, but gas giants can only have moons. Yet, both are essentially just massive spheres of gas. So what separates one from the other? Find out at:
http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/what-is-the-difference-between-brown-dwarfs-gas-giants-and-stars/

Image via NASA

scienceisbeauty:

Analysis through testing the variation in 3-Dimensionality of the Bombyx mori‘s spinning environment from 2D to increasingly 3D.

Absolutely fascinating.

Created at the Mediated Matter Research Group at the MIT Media Lab, The Silk Pavilion explores the relationship between digital and biological fabrication on product and architectural scales.

Source: Silk Pavillion – CNC Deposited Silk & Silkworm Construction at the MIT Media Lab (CreativeApplications.Net)

thenewenlightenmentage:

CERN Accelerator Provides Clues to Ages of Largest Explosions in the Universe
What happens inside a dying star? A recent experiment at CERN’s REX accelerator offers clues that could help astrophysicists to recalculate the ages of some of the largest explosions in the universe.Core-collapse supernovae are spectacular stellar explosions that can briefly outshine an entire galaxy. They occur when massive stars – stars that are more than eight times as massive as our sun – collapse upon themselves. Huge amounts of matter and energy are ejected into space during these events. The cores of such stars then rapidly collapse and go on to form a neutron star or a black hole.
The sequence of events in the first few seconds of a massive star collapsing is well understood. Elements in and around the core are broken down by high-energy photons into free protons, neutrons and alpha particles. Bursts of neutrinos follow. But modelling what happens next remains a challenge for astrophysicists.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

CERN Accelerator Provides Clues to Ages of Largest Explosions in the Universe

What happens inside a dying star? A recent experiment at CERN’s REX accelerator offers clues that could help astrophysicists to recalculate the ages of some of the largest explosions in the universe.Core-collapse supernovae are spectacular stellar explosions that can briefly outshine an entire galaxy. They occur when massive stars – stars that are more than eight times as massive as our sun – collapse upon themselves. Huge amounts of matter and energy are ejected into space during these events. The cores of such stars then rapidly collapse and go on to form a neutron star or a black hole.

The sequence of events in the first few seconds of a massive star collapsing is well understood. Elements in and around the core are broken down by high-energy photons into free protons, neutrons and alpha particles. Bursts of neutrinos follow. But modelling what happens next remains a challenge for astrophysicists.

Continue Reading

ggeology:

Azurite with Malachite // Morocco

ggeology:

Azurite with Malachite // Morocco

astronomicalwonders:

Wide-Field View of the Tarantula Nebula
This ground-based view of the Tarantula Nebula shows the nebula in its entirety. It is the brightest region of star formation in the local Universe. Hubble’s field of view covers just a tiny spot in the upper-right quadrant of this image, though it reveals detail invisible here, including a supernova remnant.
Credit: NASA, ESA, Digitized Sky Survey 2. Acknowledgement: Davide De Martin

astronomicalwonders:

Wide-Field View of the Tarantula Nebula

This ground-based view of the Tarantula Nebula shows the nebula in its entirety. It is the brightest region of star formation in the local Universe. Hubble’s field of view covers just a tiny spot in the upper-right quadrant of this image, though it reveals detail invisible here, including a supernova remnant.

Credit: NASA, ESA, Digitized Sky Survey 2. Acknowledgement: Davide De Martin

rhamphotheca:

 The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About Velvet Worms
by Mary Bates
Velvet worms, otherwise known as Onychophora, are reclusive little animals that have changed very little in the last 500 million years.
Scientists have described some 180 modern species. They can be found in moist, dark places all around the tropics and Australia and New Zealand. Smaller species are less than an inch long, while the largest reach lengths of about 8 inches.
They come in a dazzling array of colors and exhibit some pretty weird and complex behaviors. I’m sure you’ll be just as charmed by them as I am.
1. Velvet worms have hydrostatic skeletons. Velvet worms don’t have hard exoskeletons like arthropods. Instead, their fluid-filled body cavities are covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by their pressurized internal liquids. They move by the alteration of fluid pressure in the limbs as they extend and contract along the body…
(read more: Wired Science)
photo: Peripatoides novazealandiae by Frupus, via Flickr.

rhamphotheca:

 The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About Velvet Worms

by Mary Bates

Velvet worms, otherwise known as Onychophora, are reclusive little animals that have changed very little in the last 500 million years.

Scientists have described some 180 modern species. They can be found in moist, dark places all around the tropics and Australia and New Zealand. Smaller species are less than an inch long, while the largest reach lengths of about 8 inches.

They come in a dazzling array of colors and exhibit some pretty weird and complex behaviors. I’m sure you’ll be just as charmed by them as I am.

1. Velvet worms have hydrostatic skeletons. Velvet worms don’t have hard exoskeletons like arthropods. Instead, their fluid-filled body cavities are covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by their pressurized internal liquids. They move by the alteration of fluid pressure in the limbs as they extend and contract along the body…

(read more: Wired Science)

photo: Peripatoides novazealandiae by Frupus, via Flickr.

scienceyoucanlove:

Sacred lotus genome sequence enlightens scientists

Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor

Now researchers report in the journal Genome Biology that they have sequenced the lotus genome, and the results offer insight into the heart of some of its mysteries. The sequence reveals that of all the plants sequenced so far – and there are dozens – sacred lotus bears the closest resemblance to the ancestor of all eudicots, a broad category of flowering plants that includes apple, cabbage, cactus, coffee, cotton, grape, melon, peanut, poplar, soybean, sunflower, tobacco and tomato.

The plant lineage that includes the sacred lotus forms a separate branch of the eudicot family tree, and so lacks a signature triplication of the genome seen in most other members of this family, said University of Illinois plant biology and Institute for Genomic Biology professor Ray Ming, who led the analysis with Jane Shen-Miller, a plant and biology professor at the University of California at Los Angeles (who germinated a 1,300-year-old sacred lotus seed); and Shaohua Li, the director of the Wuhan Botanical Garden at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

“Whole-genome duplications – the doubling, tripling (or more) of an organism’s entire genetic endowment – are important events in plant evolution,” Ming said. Some of the duplicated genes retain their original structure and function, and so produce more of a given gene product – a protein, for example, he said. Some gradually adapt new forms to take on new functions. If those changes are beneficial, the genes persist; if they’re harmful, they disappear from the genome.

Many agricultural crops benefit from genome duplications, including banana, papaya, strawberry, sugarcane, watermelon and wheat, said Robert VanBuren, a graduate student in Ming’s lab and collaborator on the study. 

Although it lacks the 100 million-year-old triplication of its genome seen in most other eudicots, sacred lotus experienced a separate, whole-genome duplication about 65 million years ago, the researchers found. A large proportion of the duplicated genes (about 40 percent) have been retained, they report.

“A neat thing about the duplication is that we can look at the genes that were retained and see if they are in specific pathways,” VanBuren said. The researchers found evidence that duplicated genes related to wax formation (which allows the plant to repel water and remain clean) and survival in a mineral-starved watery habitat were retained, for example.

By looking at changes in the duplicated genes, the researchers found that lotus has a slow mutation rate relative to other plants, Ming said.

These traits make lotus an ideal reference plant for the study of other eudicots, the researchers said.

text and first photo source 

spaceexp:

stellar cluster NGC 2467, located in the southern constellation of Puppis. It is a very active stellar nursery, where new stars are born continuously from large clouds of dust and gas.

spaceexp:

stellar cluster NGC 2467, located in the southern constellation of Puppis. It is a very active stellar nursery, where new stars are born continuously from large clouds of dust and gas.

spaceexp:

The Eskimo Nebula , also known as the Clownface Nebula or Caldwell 39

spaceexp:

The Eskimo Nebula , also known as the Clownface Nebula or Caldwell 39

earthstory:

Inside a storm
Earlier this month, NASA and JAXA launched the Global Precipitation Measurement satellite, a system designed to see inside a storm in 3-D (https://www.facebook.com/TheEarthStory/posts/650462841681430).
Some of the first data from that satellite is now available and it’s both lovely and fascinating. This is the inside of an extra-tropical cyclone taken as it was churning in the waters off Japan in mid-March. You’re looking inside a storm.

The image is a combination of several types of radar and microwave data; by combining techniques the satellite can literally peer through to the inside of the storm. Using the returned data, scientists can determine intensity, movement, rain size, and even pick out rain from snow. This data might already be the most detailed, 3-D look at the rainfall patterns inside of a storm ever taken; one researcher described it as a “CAT Scan” of the storm.
Get used to these images. The GPM satellite marks a new era in peering through storms and you’re looking at the first image of that new era.
-JBB
Image credit: NASA/JAXAhttp://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/march/first-images-available-from-nasa-jaxa-global-rain-and-snowfall-satellite/#.UzV6toWa87Y

earthstory:

Inside a storm

Earlier this month, NASA and JAXA launched the Global Precipitation Measurement satellite, a system designed to see inside a storm in 3-D (https://www.facebook.com/TheEarthStory/posts/650462841681430).

Some of the first data from that satellite is now available and it’s both lovely and fascinating. This is the inside of an extra-tropical cyclone taken as it was churning in the waters off Japan in mid-March. You’re looking inside a storm.

The image is a combination of several types of radar and microwave data; by combining techniques the satellite can literally peer through to the inside of the storm. Using the returned data, scientists can determine intensity, movement, rain size, and even pick out rain from snow. This data might already be the most detailed, 3-D look at the rainfall patterns inside of a storm ever taken; one researcher described it as a “CAT Scan” of the storm.

Get used to these images. The GPM satellite marks a new era in peering through storms and you’re looking at the first image of that new era.

-JBB

Image credit: NASA/JAXA
http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/march/first-images-available-from-nasa-jaxa-global-rain-and-snowfall-satellite/#.UzV6toWa87Y

lawsoffate:

A photographic Exploration of the Oldest Living things in the World 
La Llareta: 2,000+ years old (Atacama Desert, Chile)
"What looks like moss covering rocks is actually a very dense, flowering shrub that happens to be a relative of parsley, living in the extremely high elevations of the Atacama Desert."

lawsoffate:

A photographic Exploration of the Oldest Living things in the World 

La Llareta: 2,000+ years old (Atacama Desert, Chile)

"What looks like moss covering rocks is actually a very dense, flowering shrub that happens to be a relative of parsley, living in the extremely high elevations of the Atacama Desert."

somersault1824:

This squid larva is only 10 mm long but adults can grow up to 2 m. Their bodies remain translucent.  via Mola Mola
photo by David Liittschwager / newswatch.nationalgeographic.com http://ift.tt/1ofcy5d

somersault1824:

This squid larva is only 10 mm long but adults can grow up to 2 m. Their bodies remain translucent.
via Mola Mola

photo by David Liittschwager / newswatch.nationalgeographic.com http://ift.tt/1ofcy5d

ichthyologist:

Coral Fungi

I saw this cool clump of fungi while I was out walking yesterday. It belongs to the clavarioid group of fungi, commonly known as coral fungi.

© via Flickr